Category Archives: Psychology

This Just In: Women Like a Man with Moves

 

Washington Post Dance GraphicThis just in from the frontiers of evolutionary biology: Women like a man with moves. And not just any moves. Women like a man who can nod his head; twist his torso; and especially, shake a leg. Actually. Shake. A. Leg.  The faster, the better, and the right one specifically. Or so reports Christopher Ingraham in the Washington Post’s Wonkblog.

These are just some of the results of a study by anthropologists, sociobiologists, and life scientists at Northumbria University, United Kingdom, and the University of Gottinghem, Germany.

The researchers wired-up nineteen men with motion sensors, asked them to dance for 30 seconds to a steady drum beat, filmed them from 12 camera angles, and converted their performances into animations featuring blank-faced, empty-crotched, naked blue avatars.

The idea was to strip the guys of any looks, cues, or socioeconomic clues–like clothing and a, um, package–that might distract female subjects from men’s actual motions. The women viewed the resulting animations and rated the dancing dummies on a standard seven-point scale from “extremely bad dancer” to “extremely good dancer.” The results were statistically sliced and diced to determine what women really want.

I could have saved  them the trouble.  Continue reading

Day 12: Tippi Hedren, No Thanks to Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock in a studio portrait, circa 1955. From Wikipedia Commons.

Alfred Hitchcock in a studio portrait, circa 1955. From Wikipedia Commons.

“Enquiring minds want to know” why I claimed in a recent post that actress Tippi Hedren, star of The Birds and Marnie, loathed Alfred Hitchcock.

Perhaps it would have been better to say that in a live interview at the Virginia Film Festival last weekend Hedren shared mixed emotions about the legendary director. Although if I am any judge of body language, she leans more toward loathing than gratitude.

The event was a 50th anniversary screening of The Birds, which appeared in 1963.

From my seat in the middle of the row about a third of the way back at the palatial Paramount Theatre, she looked mah-velous. Really. Mah. Veh. Lus

Now 83 years-old, she is just as trim as in her Hitchcock heyday, wearing a black knee-length sheath, nude hose, and high-heeled pumps I thought only Tina Turner would be able to handle at that age. Her hair is short and a tad spiky. Occasionally, her expression or movement evokes her daughter, actress Melanie Griffith. If I were being catty, I would guess that they have the same plastic surgeon. Continue reading